Author Archive for Cedar Attanasio

Cedar Attanasio is a freelance writer and editor based in San Francisco. When he’s not writing about elephants, he reports on Latin America, immigration, and the environment. You can connect with him on twitter @cedarattanasio

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Four Activists Stopping the Ivory Trade in China

June 19, 20130 Comments

If you’ve read Cedar Attanasio’s Supply/Demand series on China and Africa, you know that the ivory trade is out of control in that country. But there are committed activists doing something about it. In this post, we share just four stories of Chinese citizens speaking up against the ivory trade. Yao Ming: The Athlete China’s […]

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Supply/Demand: In Kenya, Officials Fight for its 32,000 Elephants

Supply/Demand: In Kenya, Officials Fight for its 32,000 Elephants

March 15, 20130 Comments

In the supply/demand series, we explore countries where ivory is bought and where it is sold. Kenya is a supply country. Poachers kill hundreds of elephants each year, shipping literally tons of Kenyan ivory to foreign markets. While Kenyans can do little to stem the demand—mainly from China and Southeast Asia—they try their best to […]

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Pygmy Elephants Poisoned, Leaving Baby Orphan Nicknamed Joe

Pygmy Elephants Poisoned, Leaving Baby Orphan Nicknamed Joe

February 21, 20130 Comments

One Orphaned, 14 Dead in Elephant Poisoning Last month in Malaysia, a baby elephant was found caressing its dead mother. The baby, nicknamed Joe, is the lone survivor of an attack on elephants that left 14 dead. Officials found the corpses near the intersection of reserve, logging and palm oil lands. Known for their baby […]

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Will The Next Pope Do More to Discourage Ivory Consumption?

Will The Next Pope Do More to Discourage Ivory Consumption?

February 16, 20135 Comments

Pope Benedict the 16th recently announced his retirement, and the search for a new Pope will begin soon. It’s the first retirement of a Pope in 600 years, which has many scratching their heads—along with the usual speculation as to who might be the next Pope. Elephant activists, however, wonder not who will take up […]

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